Skip to main content

About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
CSPAN 6
MSNBC 4
CNN 3
KGO (ABC) 3
WMAR (ABC) 3
KNTV (NBC) 2
WJLA (ABC) 2
WRC (NBC) 2
KPIX (CBS) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 32
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
are outgunned and may not be able to take another city. the question before president obama now, should be our u.s. arm the rebels? >> i am not ruling it out or in. >> we will have more from the president in a one-on-one interview with brian williams later in this hour. the air starks' targeted tripoli tonight. 22 tomahawk missiles. the largest air assault in recent days. the defense department says the price tag for u.s. taxpayers so far is about $550 million. that is expected to run about $40 million more over the next three weeks. hillary clinton today called this a turning point in libya when she was in london. she met with one of the rebel leaders. what are you seeing on the ground in libya? >> i still can't get over that number, $550 million to destroy tanks from the air. i don't understand how the price tag gets so high so quickly. it could look like a turning point on the ground, but for gaddafi's forces, he is crushing the rebellion. horrible reports emerging. here in the east, his troops began a counteroffensive, erasing many of the gains they had accomplished. >> at times today the rebe
new american security. we will talk with the u.s. import export bank on president obama's trip to latin america and what it means for u.s. trade. after that, we will discuss the implementation of the health care law. ♪ host: as president obama cut his latin america trip short, and returns to washington, the washington post reports that key nato allies have tentatively agreed to take the lead role. but none have officially signed on. other news out of the middle east -- the yemen president pledging to step down when your early has not satisfied opponents. help from saudi arabia is likely to be rejected. we will keep you updated throughout today's "washington journal." the nation's health-care law turned 1 years old today. we have a separate line set aside for health care .ractitioner i the new health care law -- it says, a loose federation of left-leaning groups have gathered to peddle the virtues of health care reform. it is like we have to world. the article says that in other words, the future is very uncertain right now. i would not give more than a 50- 50 chance that all
center to address e glacier melt in the andes. in addition, a new u.s.-chile business council will encourage coaboration between our countries and areas like energy efficiency and renewable technologies. our governments have agreed to share our experience in dealing with natural disasters, area where chile has enormous expertise which is critical to recovery and economic reconstruction. we discussed our shared commitment to expanding education exchanges among our students. we can learn from each other and bring our country even closer together. in my speech i will announce an ambitious new initiative to increase student exchanges between the u.s. and latin america, including chile. even as we deepen cooperation between our two countries, i want to take this opportunity to commend chile for the leadership role is increasingly playing across the americas. chile is a vital contributor to the un mission in haiti, where we agreed that yesterday's election is an opportunity to enhance recovery efforts. strong legislation will fight the scourge of human trafficking. mr. president, i
and the u.s. involvement. one of the headlines in "the washington times" -- "the rebels move towards tripoli." the baltimore sun" with libya facing questions. the public and congress question the u.s. involvement. in "the wall street journal" this morning "the u.s. will not back intervention." we continue our discussion with involving the u.s. and its involvement in the situation in libya, two words. coming up, "regime change." what should the u.s. mission be as the situation continues to develop in libya and whether or not regime change should be on that list. the numbers are -- host: if you have called in the last 30 days, send us a message electronically. the e-mail address is journal@c- span.org. among the items in the paper talking about u.s. and its involvement in the libyan situation is this op-ed piece by fred stevens in "the wall street journal." "bolivia mission was never about regime change -- the libyan mission was never about regime change." in this, he quotes gates. "the mission was never about regime change." the article goes on to say "does this mean the mission accomplished"
on rebels this hour. new targets, more carnage and the intense pressure for u.s. military action. >>> also, the crisis that libya keeps pushing up gas prices across the country. that's creating more economic misery here at home, and new political danger for president obama. plus, protesters warn the u.s. congress may, may be on the brink of stoking new violence against muslims. anger and anticipation are building before controversial hearings this week on islamic extremism in america. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." libya centering the fourth week of what's now a full-fledged civil war. moammar gadhafi's forces are claiming new gains in their pounding of rebel-held cities. gadhafi maintaining a tight grip on the capital of tripoli, and the opposition appears to be holding out to benghazi in the east, but there are conflicting reports about who is in control of several other key cities, where fierce, fierce battles have been raging now for days. diplomatic sources at the united nations say the united states is working with france and britain on draft resolution on libya, a
in the u.s. customers can expect better coverage. and also fewer pricing plans. >> let's hope. >> let's hope so. >>> here's your monday forecast, everybody. have some heavy rain in southern california. showers in san francisco, portland and seattle. another 2 feet of snow in the sierra range and a foot in the southern rockies. showers from the upper midwest to the ohio valley. a wintry mix in northern new england and rain here in new york and in philly. >>> 70s from dallas and miami. 64 in omaha. 60s from billings to salt lake city. near 70 in phoenix. >>> well, it was a stunning close encounter that was simply out of this world. >> pretty cool. i don't know if anybody saw this around here. take a look at this. it looked to the heavens saturday night. you were probably treated to a full moon like none other. scientists call this a super moon because it came so close to the earth. the closest it's come in nearly two decades. >> after the super moon rose in the east it appeared 14% larger and 30% brighter than a regular full moon. you said your dad is really into astrono astrono astrono
will speak to the nation tonight to further explain the u.s. mission in libya. good morning, everyone. it is monday, march 28th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halperin. you're going to be driving the week today. >> i will be doing some of that. >> national affairs editor for "new york" magazine, john heilemann and msnbc political analyst pat buchanan in the studio here this morning. i love that. >> pat in the flesh. >> you're okay after that accident. >> i hope the other people are okay. >> it doesn't sound like it. hope everyone had a good weekend. i had another trip to the e.r. what else is new? >> oh, my. >> kids. we have a lot going on today. she's fine. thanks for asking. >> you're here. >> sprained ankle. no, not me. we have a lot going on today. we talk about the president's address to the nation tonight, how the libya mission plays into the obama doctrine. i think it does. also, in the 7:00 a.m. hour we'll bring in the executive editor of "rolling stone" magazine, eric bates. "rolling stone" is out with anothe
to the streets in support of the international air campaign this. the u.s. commander in the region says the strikes protected the city from new government attacks and now says international forces are trying to extend the in fly zone to qaddafi's power center of tripoli. we have coverage of our new war on libya, jonathan hunt is on the opposition movement but first to rick leventhal in benghazi much the airstrikes aim to protecting other cities. is it working? >>reporter: well, we have seen the results, between benghazi and to the south where the jets, 95 percent of the missions carried out by u.s. fighter jets neutralizing tanks and heavy armored between here and the southern city 95 miles down the road. taking our thanks and artillery but in that town, qaddafi's army is in control with a major check point north and west of the city with tanks and heavy artillery. the rebels are being beaten back and the jets are not targeting those tanks and other positions because they're in the city limits so we did hear that there were airstrikes to our west. where the population has been taking a
marine in the theater has talked about the main problems, that only with u.s. direct involvement and substantial financial infusions of money -- the budget for a spans greater than the entire afghan gdp. when we leave, how will the afghan government pay for it? from his perspective, on the ground, almost entirely by u.s. supervision and u.s. financing. >> first of all, that does not give adequate credit to our afghan partners. marja, which was liberated less than a year ago, which took 4200 u.s. marines when we started, which is down now to 1600, they have been able to hold the district community council election. this is right after their great debate. it was neat stuff. this was them running this. there are 10 schools open now in marja. there were zero under the taliban. these are afghans teaching in the schools, not us. we may have to rebuild the schools, working to repair irrigation systems, the market's the use to sell exclusively illegal narcotics and weapons and explosives -- there are now about 15 markets that sell household goods, food, and clothing. these are the afghan
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
now entered it's second week. why the u.s. is now trying to take a back seat in the operation. >>> one maryland county is trying to put more room between protesters and funerals, how they plan to do it. >>> the fbi says she stuffed nearly $80,000 in cash into her underwear, i'm kelly mcpherson, coming up on eyewitness news, we'll detail additional charges for ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, >>> welcome back to eyewitness news saturday morning. i'm gigi barnett. >>> i'm tim williams. it is around 30 degrees at bwi, marshal in baltimore a degree or so warmer. it will not be a very warm day overall. the sky is brightening. we have clouds but the sun is peaking through the horizon. we have a good bit of cloud cover right now. that is ahead of a storm system that is moving in. it will be passing on our south side over the next 12 hours or so. we will start to see the potential for snow showers that we'll talk about in a moment. for today 46 degrees, chilly with times of clouds and sun. 30 degrees, mostly cloudy with a little snow late. we're talking after midnight. your day's events today we'll be oka
. >>> and more now on japan's nuclear crisis and concern about the risks from radiation. the u.s. embassy is urging people within 50 miles of the nuclear plant to evacuate. that's 1.9 million people. japanese officials have told those living within 12 to 19 miles to stay indoors. earlier, the government evacuated about 200,000 people living within a 12-mile radius. and of course the biggest risk is to workers inside the plant trying to avoid a meltdown. more from dr. begsanjay gupta. >>> an important piece of the puzzle, what are radiation levels inside the plant? we know the levels are higher inside where workers are trying to do their work. they try and protect themselves with this, a hazmat suit. they may use a mask that has a little respirator on it. these sort of things provide some help against some forms of radiation but not against the most dangerous forms of radiation like gamma radiation. there's also little sensors that they may use to find out how much radiation they're being exposed to or what the contamination is. these aren't protecting people as much as giving them in the
, democratic congressman dennis kucinich speaks out. he wants to ban all funding from u.s. operations in that country. we ask him why live. nuclear mistake. operators say a strike in radioactivity that prompted evacuation wasn't accurate. after an error like that, can information from japan about the nuclear reactors be trusted? budget battle. at the beginning of the 112 congress, two freshmen from opposite sides of the aisle promise to work together but with another budget battle looming, can they do it? we talk to the two lawmakers again live. all of that, plus a scandal involving the new york city fire department. should the city be forced to pay money to those who couldn't pass the entrance exam? i'm breech breech and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now -- i'm shannon bream and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now. we begin in japan. the spike in radiation level that led to evacuation was just a mistake. we have the latest. >> reporter: it was a breach coming from the authorities this sunday and we heard an offic
in libya. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's perhaps, monday or tuesday of next week. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of a u.s. ally. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyon
the effort to topple a dictatorship. with the u.s. currently involved in afghanistan, iraq, and providing large-scale humanitarian assistance in japan, it does not diminish." collins of maine said this. "i remain troubled that the president did not seek congressional consent in the absence of a national emergency. libya does not affect our country's vital interest." the president talked about who will lead and when. here is what he had to say. >> this transfer from the united states to nato will take place on wednesday. going forward, the lead in enforcing the no-fly zone and protecting civilians on the ground will transition to our allies and partners. i'm fully confident that our coalition will keep the pressure on gaddafi's remaining forces. in that effort, the united states will play a supporting role, including intelligence, logistical support, search and rescue assistance, and capabilities to jam regime communications. because of this transition to a broader nato-based coalition, the risk and cost of this operation to our military and to american taxpayers will be reduced significan
. violence rips law the middle east and the arab world. and now the u.s. is handed over control of the no-fly zone to nato but the u.s. military is still deeply involved. so what is going on? a live report moments away. and a muslim teacher asks for three weeks off to go on a pilgrimage and the school says "no way," she did not work there long enough and the department of justice is suing the school. what is up with that? >> states want to tax big corporations to fix their deficit instead of changing policy so now one big company, caterpillar, employs thousands of people, is ready to flee illinois. could this happen in your state? we continue right now with "fox and friends" this morning. >> welcome, everyone. you are watching "fox and friends" today. >> welcome to "fox and friends" on saturday morning. thank you for waking up with us. that is dave briggs and heather is here and i am clayton. >> lots going on today. >>dave: we start with new developments in libya where rebels have retaken the key town of ajdabiya after a fierce battle with muammar qaddafi forces and rick is live inside th
: the u.s. stored supply of oil called the strategic petroleum reserve contains 72-- 727 million barrels, enough to keep nation powered for a couple of months. those who want oil released from the reserves now say it would calm spiking gas prices so an economic recovery isn't threatened. after hurricane katrina, 30 million barrelses were released. oil prices dropped 3.7%. during the first gulf war, 34 million barrels were released and in one day prices dropped 33.4%. but some economists say the oil reserves should be saved for a true emergency and this isn't it. >> i think it's premature to open up the strategic petroleum reserve. i don't think it's going it to make a big difference with respect to prices. and i think at this point we can digest these prices. >> reporter: maybe so, but it doesn't go down easy. >> as a students's kind of tough to be able to pay the bills and pay these kind of gas prices. >> reporter: right now the average price of gas is still 61 cents below the record set in july 2008 of $4.11 a gallon. russ. >> mitchell: at least some good news there. sheryl attkisson i
for gadhafi, to get him into exile. well get into that with the u.s. bourd to the united nations, susan rice. >>> first, we go to jake tapper at the white house. >> reporter: good morning, george. the president said a confluence of events compelled the u.s. to act to stop a massacre. a moral and a strategic case to act. and broad support for reaction throughout the world. but, george, that did not stop the president's critics. the president said they were a special set of circumstances. >> the united states has worked with our international partners to mobilize a broad coalition, secure an international mandate to protect civilians, stop an advancing army, prevent a massacre and establish a no-fly zone. >> reporter: also clearly informing his decision were lessons from two previous presidents. why would the u.s. not militarily seek regime change in libya? >> to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. >> reporter: but also the responsibility to prevent a massacre, as did not happen in the former yugoslavia during bill clinton's tenure in 1995. >> as president, i refuse to wait for images of
carrying out any sort of no-fly zone resolution like the one that was passed yesterday. in terms of u.s. involvement, when you think of a no-fly zone, the first thing that comes to mind is american fighter pilots flying over foreign country. but the u.s. has many more ways that it could contribute to this effort. from folks i've been speaking to here in the building, there's also could be the possibility of unmanned drones being used in the area. the u.s. has signal jamming aircraft that could disrupt the communication between colonel gadhafi and some of his forces. they also have radar aircraft that could help coordinate some of the air traffic control if you had planes going out on no fly missions. even planes from other countries. right now, the u.s. has about five warships in that area, although the aircraft carrier, the "uss enterprise" that was in the mediterranean sea has now left. left earlier this week and now out in the arabian sea. there has been, within the u.s., a real debate about this no-fly zone primarily on two fronts. one says the u.s. waited much too long. in fact, th
the country on u.s. action with libya with critics on both sides of the aisle hammering about the plan. what does he need to say? a former presidential speech write are is here next. >> dave: getting bang for their buck. radio shack, make ago unusual offer. buy satellite tv, get a gun. good idea? we report you decide. >> clayton: sometimes you want to shoot your tv. your cable. introducing the thunderbolt by htc. immense power. scorching speed. the first phone strong enough to run on the fastest, most advanced 4g network in america. the two trains and a bus rider. the "i'll sleep when it's done" academic. for 80 years, we've been inspireby you. and we've been honored to walk with you to help you get where u want to be. ♪ because your moment is now. let nothing stand in your way. ♪ [ giggles ] let nohey, max.nd in your way. [ announcer ] you can help significantly extend your dog's healthy years. a groundbreaking 14-year study by purina... proves that puppy chow, then dog chow nutrition, fed properly over a lifetime, can help extend his lovable antics up to 1.8 healthy years. long live yo
>>> good morning. moammar gadhafi troops launch a major counteroffensive. is it time for the u.s. to consider arming the opposition? >>> dangerous dyes -- does the coloring in foods we eat every day have a negative impact on a child's mood and behavior? this morning, the new search for a link and what some parents are already doing just in case. >>> and the polar prince on his trek through the arctic. prince harry opens up to us about his most important duty at the royal wedding. >> are you thinking about what you will say? think about what you'll say when i'm stuck in a tent. our conversation with prince harry today, wednesday 30th, 2011. . good morning, welcome to "today" on a wednesday, i'm matt laur. >> rebels were making a rapid advance toward tripoli. >> those rebels retreated some 100 miles we'll get the late echt in a live report from libya straight ahead. and we'll talk to republican congresswoman michelle bachmann, who has been critical of president obama's involvement of troops in libya. >> a bizarre case in florida, an honor student who has been offered scholarships t
moammar gadhafi's troops launch a counter offensive. is it time for the u.s. to consider arming the opposition? >>> dangerous dyes -- does the coloring in foods we eat every day have a negative impact on children's food and behavior? what some parents are already doing just in case. >>> and the polar prince on his trek to the arctic. he opened up to us about his most important duty at his brother's wedding. >> are you thinking about what you will say? >> writing a speech while i'm stuck in a tent at minus 40. >> our conversation with prince harry today, wednesday, march >> our conversation with prince harry today, wednesday, march 30, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a wednesday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. the rebels in libya, aided by coalition air strikes were making a rapid advance to tripoli but have taken a beating from forces loyal to moammar gadhafi today. >> the rebels have retreated some 100 miles. we'll have the late nest a live report from libya ahead. we'll also talk to michelle bachman w
and frustration from muslim americans before some capitol hill hearings this week. they say the u.s. government is unfairly targeting them because of their religion. >>> you know she's got the golden touch. oprah winfrey has a knack for identifying new tv talent. we're going to meet a young comic in a wheelchair who is so promising he's landed his own show. >> on her network. inspiring story. >>> the fighting in libya has escalated drastically. gadhafi's military used gun ships, helicopters and rockets. to pound rebel forces. >> hospitals are now trying to cope with the constant flow of wounded fighters. lama hasan reports from benghazi. >> reporter: fierce battles raged on sunday's rebel fighters pushing westward toward tripoli were met by air attacks and ground forces loyal to libya's leader moammar gadhafi. >> all i saw is bombs and bullets. we were trying to escape and come back. i was begging everybody to, like, give me a ride. it was really scary. >> reporter: front line now appears to lie between two towns. they were telling us it was too dangerous to proceed.
intelligence-gatherering. this is the first step to where the u.s. could be doing covertly arming the rebels in their fight against gadhafi. now, u.s. officials caution that they have not done that yet. this is essentially laying the legal groundwork to do that. once you do, it comes under fairly strict congressional oversight, but done in a classified way, carl. >> chuck, what has the white house said about this? what are they legally able to say if they want to deny it? >> reporter: it's a covert operation and is legally deniable. that's number one. the white house is not confirming anything. obviously a few weeks ago when this crisis began they did announce that the full capabilities of the u.s. intelligence community would be used. now, at the time the implication was this was about the over the air surveillance, things like that in order to try to track gadhafi's movements. it was also at that time that the cia operatives were going into the country to begin gathering intelligence about the operation and gadhafi. one other thing, carl, the u.s. intelligence community is very optimistic
of the u.s. debate in part of the transfers to the transitional council? >> we haven't made a decision about arming the rebels or arms transfers, so there has not been any need to discuss that at this point. we did discuss nonlethal assistance and discussed ways of trying to enable the transition national council to meet a lot of their financial needs and how we could do that through the international community, given the challenges that sanctions pose, but recognizing they obviously are going to need funds to keep themselves going. we discussed a broad range of matters and certainly their presentation, which some of you may have seen earlier today as to what kind of civil society and political structure they are trying to build until libya, are exactly in line with what they have consistently said were their goals, their commitment to democracy and to a very robust engagement with people from across the spectrum of libyans is, i think, appropriate. we do not have any specific information about specific individuals from any organization who are part of this, but, of course, we are gett
. they say the u.s. government is unfairly targeting them because of their religion. >> and you know she's got the golden touch. oprah winfrey has a knack for identifying new tv talent. we're going to meet a young comic in a wheelchair who is so promising he's landed his own show. >> on her network. inspiring story. >> absolutely. >> really is. >>> before that, the fighting in libya has escalated drastically. gadhafi's military used gun ships, helicopters and rockets. to found rebel forces. >> hospitals in the rebel-controlled cities are trying to cope with the constant flow of wounded fighters. lama hasan reports from benghazi. >> reporter: fierce battles raged on sunday's rebel fighters pushing westward toward tripoli were met by air attacks and ground forces loyal to libya's leader moammar gadhafi. >> bombs and bullets. we were trying to escape and come back. i was begging everybody to, like, give me a ride. it was really scary. >> reporter: front line now appears to lie between two towns ras lanuf and bin jawad. abc news was able to make it as far as brega before being turned around
to scale back u.s. military involvement in libya. >>> and tiger woods tees off in the arnold palmer invitational this afternoon. it has been a year since woods won a pro golf tournament. >> you know he's saying, please, let me win something. >> hope his putter works. >> oh, boy. okay. >>> finally, as you know, we do love animal stories around here. so, we could not pass up the chance to tell you about a cat in england named smokey. smokey the cat. >> name smokey the cat. reminds me of the movie "friday." they say when a cat is happy he purrs. smokey must be the happiest cat in the world. nick watt has the story. >> reporter: smokey seems pretty normal. fury, friendly, but that's because the volume's down. crank it -- unreal. and almost constant. is smokey the loudest cat in the world? 92 decibels. most cats peak at 20. but what does 92 decibels mean? well, it's louder than a washing machine. that's 70. about the same of a truck engine idling across the street and just a fraction less than what you would hear from a jet engine as a plane comes in to land. who's a nois
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)